Pierre Hermé’s olive oil and vanilla macaron (macaron a l’hhuile d’ olive et vanille)

white choc olive oil macarons cover

How many of you have tried Pierre Hermé’s olive oil and vanilla macaron? If you have not, would you like to try it?

The olive oil and vanilla macaron  is amongst his signature macarons.

I have to admit that I have been hesitant about using olive oil in a dessert not just as a fat (in muffins or oil based cakes) but as a flavouring agent (usually with the use of a fruity/grassy olive oil).

I was sold when I’ve tried the lemon olive oil cake (which has become one of my favourite recipes); one of my favourite indulgences is to buy a good quality dark chocolate ice cream and drizzle over a scoop with my favourite olive oil. That rich, dark chocolate with a fruity olive oil flavour is simply sublime.

Once I have moved past that mental barrier of using flavourful olive oil in desserts, I hardly need any convincing on using olive oil in my desserts. The flavour is second to none and replaceable by very few.

Although I have yet to try this particular macaron, I’m always game for an adventure when it comes to macaron flavours. On top of that, I can imagine the flavours of  vanilla bean and white chocolate working astounding well with a light, fruity olive oil.

***

pierre herme white choc olive oil macaron

I made the macaron shells with the recipe that I’m most familiar with, using the French meringue method. The ganache recipe seems very easy but it sounds more simple than it is.

It is quite difficult to emulsify the olive oil with the white chocolate ganache, hence, the best thing to do is to add the olive oil in a stream gradually. And no matter what, stir it constantly. It needs to be well emulsified – smooth and creamy (not with a layer of oil at the top). This may take a bit of patience but you will get there.

Another thing, the ganache is very, very soft. I would recommend that you refrigerate it until it has firmed up before you begin piping on top of your macaron shells. It’s best to work fast – and refrigerate the macarons as you go along before the ganache starts leaking out (fast and furious).

I didn’t add the olives into the center of the macarons because I didn’t have the green olives that were recommended by

I made the macaron shells (as you might have noticed, I didn’t colour it olive green because I didn’t have that colour) with the recipe that I’m most familiar with, using the French meringue method. The ganache recipe seems very easy but it sounds more simple than it is.

It is quite difficult to emulsify the olive oil with the white chocolate ganache, hence, the best thing to do is to add the olive oil in a stream gradually. And no matter what, stir it constantly. It needs to be well emulsified – smooth and creamy (not with a layer of oil at the top). This may take a bit of patience but you will get there.

Another thing to note, the ganache is very, very soft. I would recommend that you refrigerate it until it has firmed up before you begin piping on top of your macaron shells. It’s best to work fast – and refrigerate the macarons as you go along before the ganache starts leaking out (fast and furious).

I did not put any sliced green olives in the centre of the macarons because the only olives I had were Kalamata (black) olives and I’m not so sure if they will work.

These macarons taste superb even without the olives!

I really LOVE this flavour! If you have had any doubts about this macaron before you reading the post, I do hope that you would be swayed to try it at the very least.

The light fruity and floral notes of the olive oil can be detected but not in an overpowering manner. It works very well with the vanilla laced sweet white chocolate, by cutting through its sweetness and bringing a new dimension of flavour to the otherwise, boring white chocolate ganache.

This macaron a l’Huile d’ olive et vanille goes to the long list of creative and original flavour combinations from Monsieur Hermé.

Merci beaucoup…for bringing us these brilliant creations..

x,
Jo

white chocolate olive oil macarons

Recipe: Macaron a l’Huile d’ Olive et Vanille
Recipe adapted from Pierre Hermé’s Macaron
Makes about 35-40 

Olive Oil Ganache

Ingredients:
60ml 35% fat cream
1/4 vanilla bean, scrapped
90ml extra virgin olive oil (a light, fruity one will work better than a strong one with grassy flavour)
135g White chocolate couverture (I used Callebaut while Pierre Herme uses Valrhona Ivoire white chocolate )

Method:
1. Melt the couverture chocolate in a bain marie. In a separate pot, bring the cream to a boil with the split and scraped vanilla bean.

2. Remove the vanilla bean and gradually pour the cream into the melted white chocolate. Stir so it emulsifies with a rubber spatula. Pour the olive oil at when the ganache is at 40 degrees celcius. It is important to gradually stir in the olive oil so that it emulsifies. This may take a while.

3. Cover with a cling wrap and leave to crystallise at room temperature. Set aside till it has thickened to pipable consistency. I left the ganache in the fridge for a while so that it can firm up more quickly.

olive oil ganache

Macaron shells ( I use my recipe for this instead of PH’s recipe)
Recipe adapted from Le Cordon Bleu
Makes 60-70 regular sized shells

Ingredients:
120g ground almond meal
10g cocoa powder
130g icing sugar
100g egg whites, aged if possible, at room temperature
pinch of cream of tar tar
120g caster sugar

colouring, optional (Pierre Herme uses an olive green colour for these macarons but I went with a beige)

Method:
1. Prepare your baking trays: Place baking parchment on trays.
Process the almond meal in a food processor. Then, dry the ground almond meal in a 100 degrees celcius oven for approximately 15 minutes, or until it doesn’t clump together when pressed between two fingers.

2. Sift together the ground almond meal, cocoa powder and icing sugar.

3. Make a french meringue: begin by whisking the egg whites in a clean, grease-free mixer bowl at low speed. Add in the cream of tar tar when the egg whites turn foamy.
Increase the speed to medium-high and whisk until soft peaks before adding the caster sugar gradually.

4. When all the sugar has been added, increase the speed to high and whisk until stiff and glossy peaks. You will know when it’s ready if you lift the whisk and the mixture is firm and doesn’t droop. (see picture above)

5. Add in 1/4 of the meringue mixture to your almond meal and icing sugar mixture. Fold them together. Add in colouring at this point. You do not have to be too careful about knocking the air out at this point. What you want is to lighten the mixture to a similar consistency as the meringue so it is easier to fold through the rest of the meringue.

6. Add in the remaining 3/4 of the meringue and fold gently to incorporate.
When it is well-combined, smear the mixture against the sides of the bowl with your spatula to achieve macaronage. This should be done about 10- 12 times to achieve a smooth, glossy mixture, without holding peaks. When you lift your spatula, the mixture should fall in about 5-6 seconds. The consistency should be similar to your choux pastry mixture.

7. When it is done, fill the macaron mixture into a piping bag with plain nozzle size 8 or 10 and pipe the macaron shells onto a baking sheet. Try to pipe them as evenly as possible and leave about 1/2 inch gap in between the macarons. The mixture will spread a little.
After piping the macaron shells, rap the tray against the kitchen counter a couple of times. This will help the pied (or foot) of the macarons to form.

8. Let the macarons rest for about 30-45 minutes in an air-conditioned environment until they have form a skin and the batter does not stick to your fingers when you touch it.

9. Bake in a preheated oven on the center rack at 165 degrees celcius for about 15 minutes and allow it to dry in the oven, with the oven door slightly ajar for 2-3 minutes. The macaron shells are ready when the bases are dry. You can try lifting one shell out to test, it shouldn’t stick to the baking parchment.

10. Allow the macaron shells to cool on its baking tray before attempting to peel them off the baking sheet. They would release themselves more easily after they are cooled.

To assemble:

  1. Pair up similar sized macaron shells together before you begin piping the filling.
  2. Using a plain nozzle size no 8 or 10, pipe the ganache in the centre of one of the macaron shells. Place the second shell on top of it and twist it gently until the filling comes right to the edges of the macaron. Pierre herme also adds a slice of slice of green olive in the centre but I omitted that.
  3. Place it into the fridge to allow the macarons to mature at least 24 hours before consuming. This maturation process is important for the macaron shells to absorb the flavours and moisture from the filling giving it a nice chewy centre.

* Finish the matured macarons within a few days, otherwise the shell will be too soft.

photo 2

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About jothetartqueen

My first love is eating. A very close second is my love for baking and cooking. I passionately believe that the best form of appreciation of something is almost always through the creation of it. This passion took me on a whirlwind, unforgettable ride through the patisserie diploma course at Le Cordon Bleu (Sydney). Join me on my discovery for the love of food – through the kitchen, through the markets, through experimenting, tasting and loving.
This entry was posted in Baking, Macarons and tagged , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

15 Responses to Pierre Hermé’s olive oil and vanilla macaron (macaron a l’hhuile d’ olive et vanille)

  1. This looks like a great recipe, and a creativeway to use olive oil! thanks for sharing!

  2. Hi Jo, as always your macaron looks so pretty and delicious. I just bake my very first macaron few days ago and love the excitement and the challenge. Will try to bake more learning from you and your yummy recipe. Cheers.

  3. You always share the most amazing recipes with us and if that’s not enough your photography is simply perfect. I too rarely use olive oil in desserts, though I think there is a family recipe somewhere for a polenta cake that uses olive oil and has been passed down on our Sicilian side of the family. Thank you for sharing today!

    • thanks for your very generous complements!

      Oh I love family recipes! hope you get to try that polenta cake and share it soon! It sounds delicious.

      yeah I just discovered olive oil in desserts and I think that they should be used in desserts more often.

  4. Such beautiful macarons and in such a creative flavour 😀

    Cheers
    Choc Chip Uru

  5. pattyabr says:

    cool you have Le Cordon Bleu recipe! Nice and interesting combo of flavors

  6. Be still my heart! I’ve been captivated by this concept for ages, but was afraid to take the plunge and make an olive oil ganache, since it seemed both risky and expensive, considering how difficult it is to get decent vegan white chocolate. I should have known the Pierre Hermes would not lead me astray, but I’m so happy you can vouch for the recipe now, too. It’s back on my to-try list! These are so lovely overall, I’d be crazy to resist.

    • Thanks Hannah. Yeah it’s also expensive to get white chocolate couverture too so it took me awhile to get to this recipe. It is a risky concept indeed but it does work and it taste wonderful. I do hope you get to try out a vegan version soon.

  7. Oh, my gosh you are one talented lady, Jo! I am terrified of trying to make macarons. If you lived close I’d ask for an afternoon of lessons:) These are gorgeous!

  8. Pingback: Macarons!! | Random meals

  9. I’m swooning. This is so gorgeous!

  10. Pingback: Olive Oil & Vanilla Macaron Recipe | Matcha Dipped Baguette

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